News

Hydrilla Threatens the Fingerlakes


Hydrilla Threatens Finger Lakes

The invasive aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, commonly called hydrilla or water thyme, has invaded the Cayuga Inlet. Hydrilla, often referred to as one of the world's worst invasive aquatic plants, was discovered in mid-August 2011 in the inlet to Cayuga Lake in Ithaca.

A multi-agency incident response task force, under the direction of the State's Office of Invasive Species Coordination at NYS DEC, is working hard to develop and implement a plan for the plant's eradication. Efforts are also underway to educate the boating public of the dangers of the plant and how they can be part of the effort to keep Hydrilla from spreading. To learn more about the plant, click on one of the photos of Hydrilla in the slideshow (above); to learn about what is being done to fight this invader, see the News articles (list at right)
Go to http://www.nyis.info/ for more information.  Photos are from the NYIS website.

<h3>Hydrilla Threatens Finger Lakes</h3>
<p>The invasive aquatic plant <em>Hydrilla verticillata</em>, commonly called hydrilla or water thyme, has invaded the Cayuga Inlet. Hydrilla, often referred to as one of the world's worst invasive aquatic plants, was discovered in mid-August 2011 in the inlet to Cayuga Lake in Ithaca.</p>
<p><img src="../uploads/tinymce/nysfola/slideshow_hydrilla%20copy1.jpg" alt="" width="158" height="149" /></p>

10.19.15 Jefferson Project Makes Waves ...

At New York's Lake George, a 32-mile-long lake located in the Adirondack Mountains, more than 60 researchers are now turning to sensors and connected systems to better understand environmental threats—including road salt, agricultural contaminants, invasive species and the growth of algae—so that they can better protect the lake and its water.

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02.08.15 Population is the cause of lak...

Thanks for publishing the two perspective columns on “Troubled Water” regarding the cleanup of Lake Champlain in the Feb. 1 edition.
Unfortunately, neither Elizabeth Courtney nor James Ehlers addresses the true cause of the water pollution, which is the tremendous growth of the human population in the Lake Champlain basin in recent decades. In just Chittenden County the population has grown from 75,000 in 1960 to 160,000 in 2013 or 111 percent.

Rutland Herald
http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20150208/OPINION04/702089917

 
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